UK government gives Brexit science funding guarantee

UK government gives Brexit science funding guarantee:

British scientists say they’re relieved by a government promise to guarantee them funding for existing EU research projects, even after the country leaves the European Union. But the reassurance only partly allays concerns about Brexit’s effect on UK science.

The United Kingdom receives billions of euros for research from the European Union, mostly from its €74.8-billion (US$83.6-billion) Horizon 2020 (H2020) programme. June’s referendum vote for the nation to leave the EU left British scientists worried that funding for existing multi-year projects could be yanked away. And the uncertainty led to reports of EU collaborators deciding to drop UK scientists from future grant applications — even though the United Kingdom is still a full member of the EU.

But on 13 August, the government announced that it will step in to pay UK contributions to EU H2020 projects after Brexit, provided that the projects were bid for before the day that the UK leaves the EU (a date which has not yet been fixed). “By underwriting Horizon 2020 funding in this way today, we are again demonstrating the importance we place on maintaining the world leading research that takes place in the UK,” said UK science minister, Jo Johnson.  

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Academies warn Brexit ‘damaging science’

Academies warn Brexit ‘damaging science’:

The UK’s national academies representing science, medicine and engineering have told the government that Brexit is already harming science.

A joint letter from seven academies says that the UK’s world-leading position in these areas is in jeopardy.

The national academies represent the best researchers in their fields.

They call for the government to make a “bold public commitment” to prioritize research in Brexit negotiations.

Individual researchers have also spoken about the effects of Brexit on their funding and collaborations.

The joint letter was written by the presidents of the Royal Society, the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Academy of Medical Sciences, the British Academy, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Royal Irish Academy and the Learned Society of Wales.

It states: “The UK’s outstanding research and innovation base is central to our economic, social and cultural well-being.

“The result of the EU Referendum presents a challenge to maintaining this excellence. The current uncertainty is having immediate implications and raises many questions.

“We stand ready to help ensure that Great Britain and Northern Ireland maintains its world leading position in research and innovation.”

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Britain’s Brexit: A self-destructive act?

To describe how quickly and drastically things can change in politics, Harold Wilson, who served twice as Britain’s Prime Minister in the 1960s and 1970s, once said: “A week is a long time in politics.” However, judging by all that… Read More ›
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UK scientists in limbo after Brexit shock

UK scientists in limbo after Brexit shock:

The dust from last week’s vote by the United Kingdom to leave the European Union is nowhere near settled, but the country’s researchers are already bracing for the fallout.

On 23 June, 52% of those who voted in the country’s referendum came out in favour of leaving the EU. No one is sure how ‘Brexit’ will affect science, but many researchers are worried about long-lasting damage. Beyond the immediate economic impacts and the potential loss of EU funding — which currently supplies some 16% of UK university research money — scientists fear a loss of mobility between the country and the continent.

“I was on a career panel only yesterday, singing the praises of the UK as a wonderful place of opportunity for young scientists, and I feel like that has changed overnight,” said Vanessa Sancho-Shimizu, an infectious-diseases researcher at Imperial College London, in response to a Nature survey last Friday. She is a Spanish national and one of many scientists who expressed similar views.

Researchers are already mobilizing to lobby for the United Kingdom to remain a participant in EU science programmes, and for domestic funding to make up any shortfalls. “We need some kind of rapid monitoring to catch fallout problems early and implement remedial measures,” says Mike Galsworthy, who led the Scientists for EU campaign.

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Brexit ‘2nd Referendum Petition’: Media Excited Over 4Chan Prank

Brexit ‘2nd Referendum Petition’: Media Excited Over 4Chan Prank:

The BBC, the UK’s national broadcaster, gleefully reported, as real, with no basic journalistic checks, an online petition that appeared to be growing at a colossal rate.

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Calm down, Britain. Brexit won’t touch your chocolate.

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LONDON — The result of the European Union referendum is in, and Brits are freaking out about its impact on their snacks. 

Of course, it’s a momentous, future-defining result that will impact everyday life in Britain.

But, while many Brits are worrying about what their future holds, others are extremely concerned about Brexit’s repercussions on chocolate. Yes, chocolate. 

A tweet pertaining to Brexit’s alleged effect on Milky Way Magic Stars prompted a massive outpouring of concern and consternation. But, it was all over nothing.  Read more…

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Twitter is worried about what Brexit means for the United States

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LONDON — You might have heard that the United Kingdom has just voted to leave the European Union. The generation defining result is one that will significantly impact Brits’ daily lives. But, Britain isn’t the only country that’s worried right now. 

As a shocked Britain reels, Twitter is worrying about what the Brexit result could mean for the presidential election in the United States. 

While British people are expressing surprise that the unthinkable has happened, many people all over Twitter are warning that the vote could serve as a wake-up call. Read more…

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We asked festival-goers at Glastonbury their reaction to ‘Brexit’

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LONDON — The results are in, and Britain is out

However, in the aftermath of this historic decision, the world – and Glastonbury – goes on, and we wanted to know what people are thinking about the outcome of the EU referendum there. 

Mashable reporter Sam Haysom is on the ground braving the mud and muck to gauge the response of attendees: 

Andrew Rayner, age 49, insurance underwriter

Image: sam haysom / mashable

“Because I didn’t actually believe it was going to happen, I hadn’t thought through all the full implications… because I felt that the campaign was so buzzword-based rather than fact-based, I find it hard to see one way or the other, but I don’t personally feel concerned about what’s happened. I feel that we’ll find a way through.” Read more…

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Young voters are blaming older generations for the Brexit result

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LONDON — The United Kingdom has voted to leave the European Union in a historic referendum, and figures suggest that certain generations may have played a key role in the outcome.

A YouGov survey showing an age breakdown of voting has prompted many young people to blame the Brexit vote on older generations. 

The figures — published after polls closed on Thursday night — suggest that 75% of 18-24 year olds voted to remain in the EU, while 53% of 50-64 year olds and 59% of people over 65 voted to leave.

The survey has prompted an outpouring of disappointment on social media among younger voters… Read more…

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Donald Trump’s first tweet about Brexit got shut down immediately

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LONDON — The United Kingdom is in shock after the nation voted to leave the EU in a historic referendum, prompting David Cameron to announce his resignation as Prime Minister. 

And, just when you thought this day couldn’t get any more dramatic, Donald Trump has shown up in Scotland. Brilliant. 

Naturally, Trump has already weighed in with his thoughts on Brexit, and it’s safe to say that it didn’t go down well. Like, at all. 

Trump’s excitement, however, was a little misjudged as Scotland actually voted for the UK to *remain* in the EU. Read more…

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