Object Name: Antennae Galaxies Image Type: Astronomical…

Object Name: Antennae Galaxies

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA/ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team

Acknowledgement: J. Whitmore (STSI) and James Long (ESA/HST)

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Some 4 billion light-years away, galaxies of massive Abell S1063…

Some 4 billion light-years away, galaxies of massive Abell S1063 cluster near the center of this sharp Hubble Space Telescope snapshot. But the fainter bluish arcs are magnified images of galaxies that lie far beyond Abell S1063. About twice as distant, their otherwise undetected light is magnified and distorted by the cluster’s largely unseen gravitational mass, approximately 100 trillion times the mass of the Sun. Providing a tantalizing glimpse of galaxies in the early universe, the effect is known as gravitational lensing. A consequence of warped spacetime it was first predicted by Einstein a century ago. The Hubble image is part of the Frontier Fields program to explore the Final Frontier.

Object Names: Galaxy Cluster Abel S1063

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, Jennifer Lotz (STScl)

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Will either of these galaxies survive? In what might be dubbed…

Will either of these galaxies survive? In what might be dubbed as a semi-final round in a galactic elimination tournament, the two spirals of NGC 7318 are colliding. The featured picture was created from images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. When galaxies crash into each other, many things may happen including gravitational distortion, gas condensing to produce new episodes of star formation, and ultimately the two galaxies combining into one. Since these two galaxies are part of Stephan’s Quintet, a final round of battling galaxies will likely occur over the next few billion years with the eventual result of many scattered stars and one large galaxy. Quite possibly, the remaining galaxy will not be easily identified with any of its initial galactic components. Stephan’s Quintet was the first identified galaxy group, lies about 300 million light years away, and is visible through a moderately-sized telescope toward the constellation of the Winged Horse (Pegasus).

Object Names: NGC 7318, Stephan’s Quintet

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA (Via Nasa’s APOD)

Pocesing And Copyright: José Jimenez Priego

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Hundreds of New Galaxies Detected in First Image From Super Telescope

Hundreds of New Galaxies Detected in First Image From Super Telescope:

The MeerKAT radio telescope isn’t even finished being built, but it’s already released its first image: a small patch of sky showcasing 1,300 galaxies.

In comparison, only 70 galaxies were known to exist in this part of the sky, which covers less than 0.01 percent of the entire celestial sphere.

The telescope in South Africa will eventually consist of 64 dishes, but it’s being built in phases in order to test for any issues that may arise. The first phase, AR1, has only 16 dishes, which is what was able to capture the image. It’s only at 25 percent capacity! Imagine what we can see when it’s at full power.

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This interacting galaxy duo is collectively called Arp 142. The…

This interacting galaxy duo is collectively called Arp 142. The pair contains the disturbed, star-forming spiral galaxy NGC 2936, along with its elliptical companion, NGC 2937 at lower left.

Once part of a flat, spiral disk, the orbits of the galaxy’s stars have become scrambled due to gravitational tidal interactions with the other galaxy. This warps the galaxy’s orderly spiral, and interstellar gas is strewn out into giant tails like stretched taffy.

Gas and dust drawn from the heart of NGC 2936 becomes compressed during the encounter, which in turn triggers star formation. These bluish knots are visible along the distorted arms that are closest to the companion elliptical. The reddish dust, once within the galaxy, has been thrown out of the galaxy’s plane and into dark veins that are silhouetted against the bright starlight from what is left of the nucleus and disk.

The companion elliptical, NGC 2937, is a puffball of stars with little gas or dust present. The stars contained within the galaxy are mostly old, as evidenced by their reddish color. There are no blue stars that would be evidence of recent star formation. While the orbits of this elliptical’s stars may be altered by the encounter, it’s not apparent that the gravitational pull by its neighboring galaxy is having much of an effect.

Above the pair, an unrelated, lone, bluish galaxy, inconsistently cataloged as UGC 5130, appears to be an elongated irregular or an edge-on spiral. Located 230 million light-years away, this galaxy is much closer to us than the colliding pair, and therefore is not interacting with them. It happens to lie along the same line of sight to foreground Milky Way stars caught in the image.

Arp 142 lies 326 million light-years away in the southern constellation Hydra. It is a member of the Arp catalog of peculiar galaxies observed by astronomer Halton C. Arp in the 1960s.

Object Names: Arp 142, NGC 2396/2397

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

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Astronomers have figured out how black hole jets burst through their galaxies

Astronomers have figured out how black hole jets burst through their galaxies:

Something as gigantic as a supermassive black hole – which can contain a mass several billion times that of our Sun – isn’t going to just sit quietly at the centre of its galaxy.

Sometimes supermassive black holes shoot out jets of hot, ionised gas, which burst out of their galaxy and into intergalactic space beyond, and scientists have finally figured out why.

The problem with supermassive black hole jets is that they’re extremely hard to predict, and this has been bugging astronomers for decades now.

Some jets will erupt from the centre of a galaxy, break through its outer halo, and appear as bright beacons streaking across the Universe, far from their home at the centre of the galaxy. Others will simply fizzle out and die before they do much of anything.

But what’s stopping them? What’s holding you back, little black hole jets?

It turns out the secret of these jets’ success is actually the very thing that can also lead to their downfall – the twisting magnetic fields that emanate from a rotating black hole.

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This dramatic image offers a peek inside a cavern of roiling…

This dramatic image offers a peek inside a cavern of roiling dust and gas where thousands of stars are forming. The image, taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, represents the sharpest view ever taken of this region, called the Orion Nebula. More than 3,000 stars of various sizes appear in this image.

The Orion Nebula is 1,500 light-years away, the nearest star-forming region to Earth. Astronomers used 520 Hubble images, taken in five colors, to make this picture. They also added ground-based photos to fill out the nebula. The ACS mosaic covers approximately the apparent angular size of the full moon.

The Orion observations were taken between 2004 and 2005.

Object Names: Orion Nebula, M42, NGC 1976

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA,ESA, M. Robberto (Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team

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